KIGALI, 6 April 2021 – The Kwibuka story, which details the 100 days of the 1994 Rwanda Genocide against the Tutsi, premiers as a podcast on Wednesday.

Hosted by Jean-Damascène Bizimana, the Executive Secretary of the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG), the podcast will debut on Spotify, a leading premium podcast company.

Jean-Damascène Bizimana - Photo The New Times

Jean-Damascène Bizimana – Photo The New Times

Rwanda - Source The Adventures of Paul and Sue

Source The Adventures of Paul and Sue

“The Kwibuka Podcast presented by the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG) thoroughly documents the preparation and execution of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda,” a statement published on Spotify reads in part.

The podcast is launching the same day Rwanda is kicking off week-long activities to commemorate the 27th anniversary and honor the memory of over a million victims of the genocide.

The Kwibuka Podcast - Photo Anchor

The Kwibuka Podcast – Photo Anchor

Through years of research, Bizimana collected detailed accounts of what happened during the Genocide.

Kwibuka podcast “is a reminder that each life lost must be counted and every memory honoured,” the statement added.

For 100 days beginning Wednesday, 7 April 2021, every podcast listener around the world can follow “episodes on how the Genocide was executed in different regions of the country”.

On Tuesday, The News Times newspaper ran a story on the upcoming podcast, citing Theogene Nsengimana, a public relations officer of the Commission.

Podcast on 110 Days of Rwanda Genocide Premiers on Spotify

Podcast on 110 Days of Rwanda Genocide Premiers on Spotify

The host, Bizimana, has served on two genocide-related commissions of inquiry.

He served on the Mucyo Commission – which analyzed the role of France in the 1994 Rwanda Genocide.

He also served on the Mutsinzi Commission, set up to probe the shooting down on 6 April 1994 of the plane of former Rwandan President Juvenal Habyarimana.

The shooting down of the plane is generally accepted as the start point of the genocide, although many victims were killed before that fateful April 6th day.

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